Unit 9: Applied Critical Analysis https://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/

Unit 9: Applied Critical Analysis
https://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Resources/159959.html
Writing Assignment and Rubric
Writing Assignment
Choose one of the reading selections and write a multi-paragraph critical analysis essay identifying the author’s thesis and purpose, briefly summarizing the selected reading, and evaluating the author’s success, or lack of success, in supporting the thesis and satisfying his purpose for writing. Make sure to AVOID logical fallacies when establishing your evidence and analysis. Your essay should include carefully considered analysis as well as proper in-text citations for the source material you integrate into your essay.
The essay should briefly summarize the claim in your chosen article as you discuss its message, and then move on to evaluate the article’s thesis (main claim), delivery/structure, purpose, overall impact, use of evidence, and strength of reasoning. It is important to know that a critical analysis goes beyond summary. Ultimately, you are deciding whether or not the author did an effective job of presenting his message to the intended audience. The information you include needs to show and support this opinion. This means each paragraph should be an evaluation of the author’s success or struggle with the article’s message and/or construction.
You will also need to include segments from the text in your essay as evidence to prove your point.
In all, you will have six paragraphs. You should have an introduction that is attention-grabbing and reveals your argument (your thesis goes here); four body paragraphs, each focusing on a different part of your critical analysis; and a conclusion that offers some memorable final thoughts on the author or article’s impact. Even though there are varying approaches to writing a critical analysis essay, the approach you should take for the body paragraphs in this essay is as follows: your first body paragraph will focus on the author’s message (providing a summary), your second body paragraph will focus on analyzing the article’s foundation, the third body paragraph will focus on analyzing the article’s structure, and the final body paragraph will focus on analyzing the article’s overall purpose and impact.
Each paragraph should have a unique link between it and the one that comes after it. The organization within the paragraphs should be purposeful and present a critical analysis of the text, not just a summary of the topic or the article’s content. Remember that you need to write sound arguments, so avoid logical fallacies. Refer to the foundation lesson on this topic if you need examples.
The grading rubric below will help you develop your paper.
Rubric
Your essay will be graded using five separate categories: Purpose, Thesis Statement, Supporting Ideas, Paragraph Development, and Grammar & Punctuation. Each of these five categories will be rated as Proficient, Developing, or Needs Improvement.
Proficient means that you have met the standards of an effective response. Developing means you have partially met the standards of a response, but it needs some revision. Needs Improvement means you did not meet the standards of response.
The rubric is uploaded in files.

Reading Selections
“Is Happiness the Beginning or the End”
“Your College Major May Not Be As Important As You Think”
https://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/NROCActiveReader.html
Sample Student Response (ONLY USE AS GUIDE)
Critical Analysis of Zac Bissonnette’s
“Your College Major May Not Be as Important as You Think”
By Isaac Wangai
https://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Resources/160646.html
Write in the format of:
Provide a TITLE for this essay
1) Introductory Paragraph (contains Introductory statement and thesis)
Tip: Introduce your claim about how successfully the author of your chosen article achieved his purpose. Your thesis statement (your opinion about how effective the article is or isn’t) should appear at the end of this paragraph.
An outline of this paragraph might look like this:
Introduction
Hook into the topic
Background of the article
Thesis (your opinion)
2) Body Paragraph 1 (contains Author’s Message)
Tip: Main Point: Think about the article’s main point or claim and decide whether the author did an effective job of presenting that information. Write a topic sentence expressing your opinion about the message’s success or challenges.
Summary: In three sentences or fewer, summarize the article’s message.
Evidence: Connecting back to the Main Point in the paragraph, use examples from the text that prove how the article does or doesn’t succeed at communicating its message.
Analysis: Include the reasoning that shows how the evidence you’ve just provided proves that the message is or isn’t effective. Connect this back to the claim you stated in the main point. You should also discuss the impact of the article’s ability or inability to communicate its message.
Link: Add ideas for how this paragraph connects to or leads into the next paragraph.
3) Body Paragraph 2 (contains Article’s Foundation)
Tip: Your second body paragraph should include:
Main Point: Think about the article’s thesis and supporting evidence and decide whether the author did an effective job of presenting that information. Is the thesis interesting and persuasive? Is the supporting evidence logical, sufficient, and convincing? Write a topic sentence expressing your thoughts as an opinion about the article’s success or challenges.
Evidence: Add examples from the text that prove the article’s ability or inability to communicate and prove its thesis with sufficient supporting evidence.
Analysis: Include the reasoning that shows how your evidence proves that the article is or isn’t effective. Connect this back to the claim you stated in the main point. How does its foundational success or failure affect its ability to be convincing?
Link: Add ideas for how this paragraph connects to or leads into the next paragraph.
4) Body Paragraph 3 (contains Article’s Structure)
Tip: Your third body paragraph should include:
Main Point: Think about the article’s structure/delivery (paragraph order, connecting reasoning between and within paragraphs, pacing, etc.) and decide whether the author did an effective job of presenting that information. Is the article cohesive and engaging throughout? Does one point build on the next? Is equal time spent developing each point? Does the author avoid repetition? Write a topic sentence expressing your thoughts as an opinion about the article’s success or challenges.
Evidence: Add examples from the text that prove the article’s ability or inability to communicate through its structure and delivery.
Analysis: Include the reasoning that shows how your evidence proves that the article is or isn’t effective. Connect this back to the claim you stated in the main point.
Link: Add ideas for how this paragraph connects to or leads into the next paragraph.
5) Body Paragraph 5 (contains Article’s Purpose and Impact)
Tip: Your fourth body paragraph should include:
Main Point: Think about the article’s overall purpose, decide whether the author achieved that purpose based on all your previous evidence. State the impact of the article’s success or lack thereof. What does it mean to be effective? If the author missed his goals, what is the consequence of that? Write a topic sentence expressing your thoughts as an opinion about the article’s success or challenges.
Evidence: Add examples from the text that show how you know the article did or did not achieve its purpose. You can briefly mention points from other paragraphs, but avoid repetition by focusing on what that evidence means in terms of purpose. How did the article do overall?
Analysis: Include the reasoning that shows how the purpose was or wasn’t met. Also, discuss the impact of the article as well as its effectiveness or ineffectiveness. Connect this back to the claim you stated in the main point.
Link: Add ideas for how this paragraph connects to or leads into the next paragraph.
6) Concluding Paragraph (contains Concluding Statements)
Tip: Leave your reader with something to think about which concludes your discussion about whether your chosen article was effective and what that result means in terms of successful argumentation. You may wish to make readers think about why they should care about whether an argument is persuasive, or address the article’s impact on the overall topic of happiness in your chosen career or major.
An outline of this paragraph might look like this:
I. Conclusion
A. Synthesis
B. Final impression
Makes sure writing is your own!!!!!! and do not copy-paste from anywhere.
Let me know if you have any questions.