Write a concise essay of 600-900 words (2-3 pages) in response to ONE of the pro

Write a concise essay of 600-900 words (2-3 pages) in response to ONE of the prompts below.
Use this concise form for your introduction: Start with a question related to the essay’s main topic, and then answer the question in a statement that identifies titles and characters and gives the main idea or relationship between ideas that the essay will develop. This assertion shouldn’t elaborate or include examples as that is the task of your body paragraphs. That’s it—after the essay’s title, just two sentences for the introduction.
Body paragraphs: Establish the idea first before providing textual evidence, supporting examples, and developing ideas. Don’t plop quotations. Use signal phrases and provide meaningful contexts from the “text” (movie, short story, poem, myth, novel, etc.). There should be a clear “bridge” connecting the quotation to your own words. Make sure you have made a clear point that develops your essay’s main argument before moving on to the next paragraph.
Conclusion: Synthesize what you have written into a clear closing argument. Close with an insight, recommendation, or lesson—about plot, about character, about readers and audiences like yourself, about storytelling, about how we make meaning from stories—depending on the topic of your essay. I can see the conclusion being your longest paragraph because it would be the place to draw out comparisons, nuance differences, etc.
Include a Works Cited page.
Write the number of your chosen prompt next to your essay’s title.
Important skills to demonstrate:
* Sustain your essay’s focus by using “good repetition” of key concepts and arguments.
* Minimize passive voice in favor of active voice. Not is shown but shows; not is caused by but causes. Etc.
* Smooth, clear integration of quotations without plopping. Quote at least once from any text you reference, but cite both quotations and specific evidence.
* Employ a second paragraph to explain the purpose of the essay and to define key concepts.
* Analysis and interpretation instead of summary and description.
* Don’t judge characters unless the point is to acknowledge a judgment.
Choose a passage of advice or wise counsel from How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia and use it as a lens through which to study protagonists. Choose any three protagonists with strong ambitions, and describe how closely they follow the counsel offered by the passage you’ve chosen from the novel.

Directions: George Orwell wrote this novel in 1948 as a satire (use of irony, hu

Directions:
George Orwell wrote this novel in 1948 as a satire (use of irony, humor, extreme exaggeration
or ridicule to expose and criticize) to point out several issues he saw in his society. Almost 75
years later, some of these same issues are still present in our society. For this essay, you will
make an argument connecting one concept/issue in 1984 to our present-day society. You
will need to use evidence from the novel and at least two nonfiction sources.
Requirements:
Your argument must be debatable, meaning someone could disagree with you.
a. Example: People rely too heavily on the internet for social satisfaction but are more
disconnected from each other than ever, much like the citizens of Oceania in
George Orwell’s 1984.
2. Need a minimum of two body paragraphs and each body paragraph must have at least
one quote from the novel and one quote from a nonfiction source (2 quotes per
paragraph, 4 quotes total)
3. All quotes must be correctly embedded and cited. Must include a correctly formatted
annotated bibliography. Failure to do so will result in a zero and a write up for plagiarism
Potential Essay Topic Choices:
Political Leaders and Big Brother
Wiretapping and/or Collection of Metadata and Telescreens
The Value of Enhanced Interrogation and The use of Room 101
News Cover-ups and Ministry of Truth (Winston’s Job)
Social Media and Winston’s Diary
Political Correctness and Newspeak (Elimination of words from our vocabulary)
Political/Social Justice Rallies and 2 Minutes of Hate/Hate Week
Social Media/Technology/Societies increasing isolation and Goals of Party
If there is another topic you’d like to connect to 1984, you can propose it to me

Major Paper 1: Literacy Narrative Purpose The purpose of this assignment is to g

Major Paper 1: Literacy Narrative
Purpose
The purpose of this assignment is to get you thinking critically about how your past experiences with literacy and language impact your current values, beliefs, attitudes, and practices around literacy and language. It is based on the threshold concept that “Writing is impacted by identities and prior experiences.”
Often, to move forward with writing, we need to understand better what’s been impacting us. For this assignment, we aim to look to the past to understand the present and make way for the future, as the goal of ENC 1101 is to prepare you for future writing. We will be doing so by using concepts of writing studies scholars to “re-see” our history through one or more of the following threshold concepts:
Writing is a process and all writers have more to learn;
“Good” writing is contextual
People collaborate to get things done in writing
Task
In this assignment, you will describe a few key moments of your own literacy history and analyze your experiences using two or more of the literacy/language concepts covered in our readings. You will use this analysis to make a specific, arguable, and thematic claim that answers the question “HOW have your PAST literacy experiences impacted your PRESENT reading and writing values, beliefs, attitudes, and practices?”
For this essay, I am asking you to do four things:
Describe three or four important literacy events from your past or recent present; these moments should help illustrate a common theme about who you are as a reader and writer today
Analyze your literacy moments using two or more course threshold concepts
Support your analysis by connecting examples and quotes from these course concepts (i.e., the readings) to your descriptions
State your current values, beliefs, attitudes, and practices of reading and writing and explain how the literacy events you’ve described above have shaped your current reading and writing identity
Your “main claim” or “thesis statement” should be an answer to this question “HOW have your PAST literacy experiences impacted your PRESENT reading and writing values, beliefs, attitudes, and practices? Use your descriptions of literacy events and analysis/ connections to course concepts to support this claim.
For your examples from your own experiences, you might choose:
a specific event that was somehow important in your development as a writer and reader
a series of related events
or a phase or period of your life in which certain people, places, or things figured prominently.
Critically, you should connect these past experiences to concepts of literacy and threshold concepts by using textual support from Wardle and Downs as evidence.
Format and other Information
4 full pages minimum (though it can be longer), not including Works Cited or any appendices you may include, 12-point Times New Roman font, double spaced, 1-inch margins, typed, doc or docx
Name and page number in upper-right header; have an appropriate title.
Final essay must follow MLA or APA format (see examples in Easy Writer)

Write a concise essay of 600-900 words (2-3 pages) in response to ONE of the pro

Write a concise essay of 600-900 words (2-3 pages) in response to ONE of the prompts below.
Use this concise form for your introduction: Start with a question related to the essay’s main topic, and then answer the question in a statement that identifies titles and characters and gives the main idea or relationship between ideas that the essay will develop. This assertion shouldn’t elaborate or include examples as that is the task of your body paragraphs. That’s it—after the essay’s title, just two sentences for the introduction.
Body paragraphs: Establish the idea first before providing textual evidence, supporting examples, and developing ideas. Don’t plop quotations. Use signal phrases and provide meaningful contexts from the “text” (movie, short story, poem, myth, novel, etc.). There should be a clear “bridge” connecting the quotation to your own words. Make sure you have made a clear point that develops your essay’s main argument before moving on to the next paragraph.
Conclusion: Synthesize what you have written into a clear closing argument. Close with an insight, recommendation, or lesson—about plot, about character, about readers and audiences like yourself, about storytelling, about how we make meaning from stories—depending on the topic of your essay. I can see the conclusion being your longest paragraph because it would be the place to draw out comparisons, nuance differences, etc.
Include a Works Cited page.
Write the number of your chosen prompt next to your essay’s title.
Important skills to demonstrate:
* Sustain your essay’s focus by using “good repetition” of key concepts and arguments.
* Minimize passive voice in favor of active voice. Not is shown but shows; not is caused by but causes. Etc.
* Smooth, clear integration of quotations without plopping. Quote at least once from any text you reference, but cite both quotations and specific evidence.
* Employ a second paragraph to explain the purpose of the essay and to define key concepts.
* Analysis and interpretation instead of summary and description.
* Don’t judge characters unless the point is to acknowledge a judgment.
Choose a passage of advice or wise counsel from How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia and use it as a lens through which to study protagonists. Choose any three protagonists with strong ambitions, and describe how closely they follow the counsel offered by the passage you’ve chosen from the novel.

Question Question on Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway. Write a 250

Question
Question on Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest
Hemingway. Write a 250-300 word response and use direct reference
to the story. “Direct Reference” means quotations to support ideas. Please
put a reference section to which would just be the story from this book of
which the story came from.
The book is: 40 short stories: A
portable anthology (6th ed.) by Beverly Lawns and Joanne
Diaz and the story is Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway.
What is the couple arguing about in the story? What
specific lines best illustrate their positions in this argument in the
first half of the story? In the second half?
I have the short story in the word file I attached.
Length – 934 words ….in single space its 2 pages.

Now that you have completed Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, you are in a good posit

Now that you have completed Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, you are in a good position to consider what critics have written about the novel. You will need a total of two critiques (also known as critical analysis essays) for this assignment.
First, use the selection of links below to locate a critical analysis essay written about the 1818 version of Mary Shelley’s novel. You may focus most of your attention on this first critique. If the author of your critique is not specified, focus on the publication of the critique.
Choose from among these sources:
Romantic Circle’s Critiques:
Critique 1
Critique 2
Critique 3
Critique 4
Critique 5
Critique 6
Professor Naomi Hetherington’s critique
The questions in the study guides should have helped you evaluate this criticism in your head. Now it’s time to write it down!
Your evaluation may go more smoothly if you approach the guiding questions in this order:
Evaluate the critic/author:
Who wrote the criticism you read? What credentials does the author have? (If you are using a valid source, you should be able to find these easily)
Find the thesis of the article:
What is the thesis of the critical article you’ve chosen? What point does the author want to make about Frankenstein?
Evaluate the thesis:
Do you agree with this thesis? Why or why not? We’ve covered many ideas in the study guides. Can you find points within the guides that support your agreement or disagreement with the critical writer(s)? Look for new supporting information rather than revisiting the same ones the critics have chosen.
Evaluate the support:
Whether you agree or disagree with the thesis, does the critic provide sufficient research from the text and outside references to make a strong case? What does the article have for support from the text or outside sources? In your opinion, what makes these references valid? Do you feel the author uses this support properly?
Next, locate a second critique about the novel that includes ideas somewhat similar (genre classification, for instance) to any of the discussions you have in your essay. The second critique can either support or refute any of the claims in your paper. The objective of this portion of the essay is to further support your opinion of the primary critic’s thesis or support. Therefore, for example, if you choose a secondary article that refutes any of your claims, you will need to counteract those ideas to bring the focus of your essay back in alignment with your essay’s thesis (your personal opinion of how the primary critic is either correct or incorrect in his or her thesis claim and/or how the first critic is either effective or ineffective in his or her support). Every discussion in this essay should ultimately support the claim you make in your thesis.
For instance, if the first critic argues that Shelley’s writing is juvenile, and if you agree, does the second critic also support this thesis? How so? If the second critic does not support your assessment of the first critic’s thesis, what evidence can you use from the text to argue that the second critic is incorrect? Consider another example: if the first critic believes the novel is autobiographical, and if you disagree, does the second critic help you argue your own view of the first critic’s thesis? If so, how? Perhaps the second critic disagrees with your view and feels the novel is autobiographical– if that’s the case, be prepared to use evidence from the text to refute the second critic’s thesis and support your own argument. Using two critiques in this way will allow you to create a polished, comprehensive Evaluation Essay that allows you to connect your own ideas to those of seasoned critics.
In addition to addressing each of the evaluative components above, develop your essay so it has a clear introduction, body, and conclusion. You must include an evaluative thesis statement in both the introduction and the conclusion. Ensure that each of your claims is supported with valid evidence from the literary criticism you have chosen; the novel, Frankenstein; and/or the study guides.
Using proper MLA style, insert parenthetical citations for all borrowed information in addition to a Works Cited page for Frankenstein and your chosen literary critiques; you are not required to cite the study guides if you use them.
Helpful Hints: For a thesis statement, try answering a question like: How and how well does this piece of criticism state and support its argument regarding Frankenstein?
You might use these as possible guidelines in crafting your thesis statement:
(Critic, aka author of the critique) uses (add critic title) to (add an adjective to describe the effectiveness of the argument such as “adequately” or “inadequately”) argue that (add critic’s thesis) by (explain why and/or include your support).
OR
(Critic)’s (add critique title) (add an adjective to describe the effectiveness of the argument such as “adequately” or “inadequately”) argue that (add critic’s thesis) because (explain why and/or include your support).
More specific thesis examples:
John Smith uses “Frankenstein Critique Essay” to adequately argue that Victor’s mother created the first monster by coddling Victor as a boy.
OR
John Smith’s “Frankenstein Critique Essay” does not effectively argue that Victor’s mother created the first monster because the novel Frankenstein too strongly supports inherent good or bad, which means nurturing roles cannot be held responsible.

This exam — your personal narrative — will take advantage of the skills you ha

This exam — your personal narrative — will take advantage of the skills you have observed while reading/annotating and writing about the short stories this semester. Naturally, you noticed the various human conditions on display. You identified the climax, determined whether narratives “suspended disbelief,” and noted foreshadowing. One of the most compelling questions is always “how could the characters have acted otherwise?” This question suggests that lessons can always be learned as a result of experiences. This is true for you as well.
The Process:
Think of your own “G-rated” experiences (this means entry can be read by an underaged person) and choose one that either taught you a lesson or changed your life.
On a note pad or your computer, draw an upside-down “V,” that is the narrative structure. Remember Canvas Module week 4 climax discussion –analysis question #5 (in “Prepare for Discussion #6”). Draw a line at the top of the apex; identify it as the location for the climax.
Next, start at the end of your story — figure out what the climax is first. — what was learned, or the moment your life changed.
As was done w/ the short stories, identify the climax in your own story. Be reminded that without a climax there is NO story.
Then, it is easy to list how you arrived at the climax. Now, work on the left leg of the narrative structure (the upside-down “V”) at bottom. Make a list of what happened (incidents that occurred) leading to the climax. This is the “rising action” which starts at the beginning of the story (up the left side of the upside-down “V”). The intensity increases w/ incidents as they move toward the climax.
Remember, the “falling action” (down the right side of the upside- down “V”) can be a very short list.
The next step is to begin the rough draft. Give background information as needed. Begin the actual narrative with words similar to these: “My life was changed when . . . ” or “I learned never to . . .” That means your story begins at the end (obviously lessons are not learned until events have ended).
Create a transition sentence using words similar to these: “It all began when I was 12 . . .” This transition bridges the gap from the lesson learned to the beginning of the story. It is now possible to tell the story in chronological or time order (this happened first, then that . . . etc.)
Tell the story. Obviously, since it is yours — use 1st person (I, me, my etc.). Continue writing the story until it is complete — min. length = three (3) pages BUT often students write much more! WHY? This is usually the only time you write about yourself — your life, your lessons. The narrative is often the longest essay students write (outside of the LRP).
Description is an important part of a written narrative. Use concrete, vivid adjectives/adverbs. You have read the “Understanding Description” page Canvas Module week 13, so you know how to make this story come alive.
All events occurred in the past — so use the past tense.
PLEASE WRITE ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING UNDER PERSONAL NARRATIVE. MY GENDER IS FEMALE AND MY AGE IS 21! (IF THAT WOULD BE HELPFUL TO ASSIST THE STORYLINE). PLEASE INCLUDE A CLIMAX, A POSSIBLE LIFE LESSON. IF YOU MUST PLEASE FEEL FREE TO MAKE UP A FICTIONAL STORY HOWEVER MADE-TO-BELIEVE THE STORY HAS HAPPENED UNDER THE GUIDELINE OF PERSONAL NARRATIVE. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO KEEP IT CREATIVE AND WITHIN THE requirements! THANK YOU!

For this project in this class, you will complete an internal, persuasive propos

For this project in this class, you will complete an internal, persuasive proposal that recommends a specific product or program or proposes to change a current policy at Collin College. Since you are a student at Collin, this is considered internal. An internal proposal is an argument submitted within an organization for carrying out an activity that will benefit the organization. Below are a few sample topics. You do not have to choose these; they are simply examples. When choosing your topics, try to select one that is a realistic as possible. (There are a couple of examples provided in this unit for your review). You cannot use any of the information, but you can use it as a guide for formatting and guidelines). Topics that you can not use are any topics related to Covid-19 laws or regulations.
Assignment Criteria Proposal:
Introduction:
In this section cover the major elements of the proposal in at least 250 words. The purpose of an introduction is to help the readers understand the context of the proposal. This section should cover the following:
What is the current problem or issue on campus?
Why is this proposal needed?
What is the overall purpose?
How will this benefit Collin College?
Proposed Program/Plan of Work:
In this section, describe how you plan to carry out the proposal. Some key questions to answer:
What information will be gathered and from where?
Biography:
In this section, provide a brief bio (paragraph) of yourself. Bios should include your name, classification (1st year, 2nd year), major, and future plans to transfer to Stanford University.
Budget:
Provide a detailed breakdown of the cost of the proposal. How much will the proposed project cost Collin College? Be as accurate as possible and include sources for validation
Task Schedule:
A task schedule provides a detailed outline of the timeline to complete
the project. The task schedule should be included in the appendices. It should
be in the form of a table or graph. See examples in canvas.
Brochure :
Proposals should include some type of visual brochure/flyer/handout that
would be distributed to guests.
Grammar and Mechanics:
The proposal is free of any grammatical errors such as misspelled words,
fragments, comma splices, word usage
References:
Include a reference page formatted in APA that includes any/all sources
used.
Past Project Topics
Add a mac lab on campus
Renovate the café on campus
Lower the cost of textbooks by changing vendors
Change a specific policy or procedure that will benefit Collin College
Add more study rooms on campus
Add uber eats on campus
Extend hours of the library or science labs
Increase security cameras on-campus parking lots
Make the campus look more beautified by adding trees and benches
Add Starbucks on campus
Make the library 24 hours during finals week
Add more parking on campus

Option #1: Analysis of an Individual Comic Strip or Political Cartoon Choose one

Option #1: Analysis of an Individual Comic Strip or Political Cartoon
Choose one comic strip or political cartoon. If you visit the website of a newspaper such as The Baltimore Sun, The New York Times, The Washington Post, etc., you should be able to search for comic strips or political cartoons easily.
Which techniques does the creator of the comic strip use? How does the creator make his/her point in the comic strip? What do we learn about the characters and/or ourselves from this comic strip or political cartoon? If colors are available, what do they tell us about this comic or cartoon? What language is used and how can that be interpreted?
And importantly, which of the key terms from the topic lesson can you discuss in your analysis? For example, how of elements of imagery, symbolism, metaphor, and/or irony help reveal the cartoon’s message?
As with all academic essays you write in this course, this essay should have a well-defined introduction with a thesis statement, body, and conclusion.
In essence, what are some of the physical elements present in the cartoon1 – characters, text, colors, etc., along with figurative elements such as metaphor and symbolism, that help to explain the cartoon’s message? It can be helpful to focus on a single element in the cartoon in its own body paragraph (including the element in the topic sentence and in the thesis) and describe how it portrays the cartoon’s message before moving to the next cartoon feature in a new paragraph.
Sample Thesis Statement: “John Smith uses (add one element from the cartoon), (add a second element from the cartoon), and (add a third element from the cartoon) to show (add the cartoon’s message).”
1A successful analysis will go beyond the obvious, literal elements of the cartoon and will analyze figurative elements, too. Use the course topic lessons to inform your analysis.
Option #2: Analysis of Multiple Comic Strips or Political Cartoons
Choose two political cartoons or comic strips created by the same person. Which techniques does the creator of the political cartoons use? How does the author make his/her point in the political cartoons? What do we learn about the characters and/or ourselves from these political cartoons? How does the language transmit the creator’s message? Using a comparison or contrast mode of development, draw conclusions about the techniques the author uses in the political cartoons and how they apply to our lives. As with all academic essays you write in this course, this essay should have a well-defined introduction with a thesis statement, body, and conclusion.
Use the point-by-point or subject-by-subject structure to compare and contrast about three to five elements found in the cartoons that help to explain how they apply to our lives or to a message present in today’s society. After you compare and contrast each paragraph, be sure to explain the message those elements and the cartoons help to depict.
Sample Thesis Statement: “John Smith’s cartoon strips Cartoon 1 and Cartoon 2 use (add one element from the cartoon), (add a second element from the cartoon), and (add a third element from the cartoon) to explain (add the cartoon’s message).”
Be sure to document the cartoon or comic strip on a Works Cited page. Please visit the following source for citing an electronic image: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/08/
The guidelines for this assignment are as follows:
Length: The assignment should be at least 500 words.
Header: Include a header in the upper left-hand corner of your writing assignment with the following information:
Your first and last name
Course Title (Composition II)
Assignment name (i.e., Cartoon Analysis)
Current Date
Format:
MLA-style source documentation and Works Cited2
Your last name and page number in the upper-right corner of each page
Double-spacing throughout
Standard font (Times New Roman, Calibri)
Title, centered after heading
1″ margins on all sides
Save the file using one of the following extensions: .docx, .doc, .rtf, or .txt